I made a thing

Sweden is currently going through one of the worst droughts in recorded history. One of the consequences of the high temperatures is that my vegetables needs constant watering. Of course this is a task that I want to automate.

I already run home assistant for some basic automation at home (mostly lights). Now, I got a pump for caravans from a cheap store, found a 12V power supply in a drawer and hooked it all together. I attached a hose and dropped the pump into my rain water barrel (which is very empty at the moment).

Having spent quite some time making holes in the rest of the hose, I now think that I have a reliable watering system. The challenge seems to be to make reliable holes in the hose. I started with a knife, ended up with a power drill and a 6mm drill bit.

For the control, I use one rule to turn the water off after 2 minutes each time, then I just have time based watering sessions at 20.00, 20.30, 21.00 and 21.30. This should hopefully be enough.

I’ll monitor how much water this uses for a few days and look for dry spots along the hose. Hopefully this is another part of the gardening automated (the lawn mowing has already been solved with a robot).

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D-Link and the GPL

Recently my router died and to get netflix flowing again, I went out and got the cheapest router I could find in the vicinity. I ended up with a D-Link DIR-842 on discount for 499 SEK. In the box, I discovered this:

It tells me to go to D-Link’s page for GPL licensed software to get the source code. It also lets me write a request the source code on physical media for a nominal fee for the media and handling. Something I naturally did (being an engineer on vacation).

While waiting for a reply, let’s have a look at the online version. When entering the URL provided you have to click through an agreement that I understand what GPL and LGPL means and that the files distributed comes with no warranties (they spend more words saying this – read it if you want the details). Clicking “I Agree” I get a popup (back to the 90’s) asking me to register my product to enjoy all the benefits of doing so. At the same time the main window continues to a list of all D-Link products containing (L)GPL software – very nice.

The list of products is 24 pages long, so I searched for my model name (DIR-842) and clicked the resulting link. This got me to the following table:

I wonder what separates firmware version 2.0CN (China?) from version 3.0. Having 950MB of translation tables seems odd, so something else must be the case. As I have firmware version 2.02 for hardware revision B1 I decided to download that bundle consisting of 590 MB of open source code as a tarball. At least, that was what I expected. Apparently, I don’t only get the sources, I also get a test report – great!

The test report rar file contained a pdf documenting the tests. On November 16, 2016, test engineer Mason Wu carried out the GPL SC tests consisting of the steps Firmware upgrade, Firmware downgrade, Compile the Open Source Software Licenses code, Check list (Before test Open Source Software Licenses), Open Source Software Digital Signature check, and License file check. All tests passed – time for celebrations!

To be completely honest, this report tells me nothing, as I don’t know what has been tested or what the test cases do. The only thing I learn is that I just put a device with almost two years old software on as my interface towards the Internet…

So what is in the source code tarball? You can see the directory structure of the tarball in the picture below (I guess someone named Lisa created the tarball). First of all, there are some licenses, then the source code.

The source code is split into open source and private, where private is a set of prebuilt binaries, while open source comes with the whole source code. The open source software is licensed under the following licenses according to the LICENSE.txt:

  • GNU General Public License Version 2 (GPLv2.0)
  • GNU Lesser General Public License Version 2.1 (LGPLv2.1)
  • BSD 2-clause license
  • BSD 3-clause license
  • Apache License 2.0
  • zlib/libpng License
  • MIT License v2.0

Looking into the realtek SDK (rtl819x-SDK-v3.4.5.1) I found the base Linux system (under rtl819x-SDK-v3.4.5.1/rtl819x). This is open source software found outside the open source directory.

There does not seem to be a license for the proprietary stuff. Not for the realtek related directories (rtk_wifi_patch and rtl819x-SDK-v3.4.5.1), nor the directory named private. I’m not sure what that means from a licensing perspective. I guess it is complicated. The nice thing with this is that I should be able to rebuild a new firmware image from this.

Continuing down the rabbit hole I’m getting really worried. Remember that this is an internet facing device. There are so many things I want to point out, but I’m on vacation so I can’t dig through the whole source code. Here are some snippets:

  • The Makefiles outputs “It’s builded” when done. Kind of cute.
  • Building is supported on CentOS 5.9 (32-bit version) with GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-54). This is a release from 17 January 2013.
  • Building has to be done as root.
  • For the proprietary stuff, there are .c.dep files showing what source files where used and their dependencies. Also, some headers are included without copyright information.
  • The open source versions are really old. Some highlights:
    • Samba 3.0.24 – from 2003. The CVE list for Samba is scary – this is a piece of software that should be updated.
    • Kernel 2.6.30 – from 9 June 2009. End-of-lifed in October 2009).

However, the most critical issue is that code is not included in the release. Looking at the directory rtl819x-SDK-v3.4.5.1/rtl819x/toolchain there are a number of GCC tools (GPLv3 licensed, so the license list is incomplete) as well as binutils delivered only as binaries. These also include realtek confidental documents (see screenshot below).

I’m stopping my dig here, but I will have to follow up my written request for the source code, unless the optical medium contains more. I thought they had learned

Posted in Embedded, Linux | Comments closed

Tooting

As web 3.0 is the next big thing – and I really like the idea – I decided to give mastodon as spin (second time around). Feel free to follow me – I’m @e8johan@mastodon.technology.

As I’m just getting started, I’m exploring this whole space a bit. I picked the instance to join (mastodon.technology) based on the fact that KDE lives there. As mastodon is federated, I can still interact with users of other instances.

Then I used the bridge app to find my twitter friends. This only works if both are using the bridge app, so I encourage everyone to try it.

Finally, I picked Mastalab as my phone app, but I’ve just used it for two minutes, so I cannot tell you if it is good or bad. What I do know is that it is open source and easily installable from the Play Store as well as F-droid

What are you using for mastodon and who should I follow? Let’s get tooting together!

Posted in Miscellaneous | Comments closed

New adventures – old challenges

Times pass and we all change. I’ve realized that I’ve gone from mostly coding at work, to almost not coding at all (I reflect on this in the Under utveckling pod – Swedish only). I’ve also realized that what I do in automotive has a much wider application (see my fosdem talk on this). Thus, the conclusion is that the time has come to change context.

I’ve also spent a lot of time on promoting free and open source software. I’ve spoken at conferences, gone to hackathlons, spoken at the university, and arranged meetups. All this culminated in foss-north which I’ve been organizing for the past three years.

The conclusion from all of this is that there is an opportunity to focus on this full time. How can free and open source software be leveraged in various industries? How does one actually work with this? How does licensing work? and so on. To do so, I founded my own company – koderize – a while back and from now on I’m focusing fully on it.

Before joining Pelagicore back in 2010 I was solo consulting for a year. This was a great opportunity and I finally got to spend some time working directly with the former Trolls at what later became The Qt Company. However, I also came to realize that solo consulting makes me go slightly mad. Also, my wife complained that I talked to much every afternoon when she came home ;-)

Thus, I want colleagues. That is why myself and some great people that I’ve passed by during my years in this field are founding Kuro Studio (the web page is minimalist – i.e. empty).

The team we’re setting up complement each other and the sum of our experience covers the full full-stack. We can do team building, purchasing, processes, QA, agile, development, design, licensing, devops – even some hardware. The goal is to create an end-to-end product design team that can help out during any phase of product development, as well as organizational development.

At the end of the day I’m still passionate about what I have been doing the past 8 years. Cars excite me, and combining that with Qt and Linux makes me even more excited. That means that I’ll still be around in that field. As a matter of fact, my first assignment is in that area.

So, at the end of the day, time pass, we grow, but some things still stay the same. A big thank you to everyone at Pelagicore – it was a great ride.

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Five days left

I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.

This year, we have the broadest program yet. 25 speakers talking about everything from community policies, GPU isolation, blockchain, historical KDE software, retro computers, IoT, Android, SailfishOS, bug triaging, crowd funding, software updates, yocto, home automation, design to sub-atomic particles.

You can still get a ticket (and make sure to bring a friend) at foss-north . Welcome!

Posted in Embedded, foss-gbg, foss-north, KDE, KDE 4, Linux, Qt, RaspberryPi, Yocto | Comments closed

foss-north approaching

TL;DR; Tickets including food are sold until April 9 – get yours now!

Organizing a conference means going through multiple stages. The first parts are the most difficult – signing up for a venue, looking for the initial speakers, finding the initial sponsors. Basically, building something out of nothing. This becomes easier over the years, and this, the third year, it has been quite fun. However, since the aim is to grow the event, we always need more sponsors, more speakers and a bigger venue.

The good thing about this year is that foss-north has passed a point where we can finally afford a venue that we can grow in: Chalmers Conference Centre. This is ideally located in central Gothenburg at the Chalmers campus where we find a lot of engineering students.

From a speaker stand-point, the call for papers also passed some sort of pivoting point, and the contents was almost tripple of what we got last year. This triggered us to move to a multi-day event, opening up half the Sunday (April 22) as well as filling the Monday (April 23) – the schedule looks great. I have a tip to other organizers – don’t go multi-day on a hunch after the event has been announced. It means dedicating a couple of weeks to puzzling. Finding a way to affort the extended venue, having to do ask all speakers which day they can attend, and generally complicating things.

Also, I was in kodsnack – a local podcast – which meant that I got approached by Chalmers Robotförening who wants to do a workshop. Of course we will do a workshop! Meaning more planning.

One of the things that is causing more concern when organizing conferences is the catering. Catering is great because everyone can eat together and we get a great mingle opportunity and so on. However, catering needs to be preordered and one thing I’ve learned is that people like ordering tickets late. Like, the hours before the event late. I’ve been up at 5 in the morning printing visitors badges as people like ordering tickets late.

That means that either I have to jepardize the budget by preordering food for more guests that we have sold tickets to, or risking being short on food. However, this is where the new venue is great, because there are three restaurants in the same building. Thus, the tickets sold this week (until April 9) includes catering, but the tickets after do not. This means missing out on the breakfast, mingle lunch and coffee break – but it means that no-one will starve during the event.

So, if you want to take part in *all* the fun, make sure to get your ticket this week. If you can’t make your mind up – there is a solution all the way until midnight before the event.

Posted in foss-gbg, foss-north | Comments closed

foss-north – the count down

This is the last day left of the Call for Papers for foss-north 2018. With the help of our great sponsors we have the opportunity to transport you to our conference if you are selected to speak. Make sure to make your submission before March 11 and you are in the race.

Why should you talk at foss-north?

  • You get to tell the world about something you are passionate about!
  • You get to visit Gothenburg, Sweden – we can even pay for your trip!
  • You get to speak to the best audience we can get!
  • You get to meet loads of nice people!
  • You get to attend the speaker’s dinner, meeting many interesting people!
  • I really want you to!

Don’t spend time pondering on why you should not talk at foss-north – instead – submit your talk proposal today!

Posted in foss-gbg, foss-north, Miscellaneous | Comments closed

foss-north – the count down

Every year we try to seed the foss-north event with a set of key speakers. This year, one of our seed speakers is Steven Goldfarb from the ATLAS project at CERN. He will take us on a journey from the vastness of the universe, to the tiniest particles we can observe – all possible through collaboration.

“On 4 July 2017, one billion people – a large portion of our planet’s population – took time out of their day to watch a one-and-a-half-hour scientific seminar featuring plots, graphs, Greek letters, and comic sans. Why? A deep-rooted survival instinct told these people that the discovery by CERN scientists of a fundamental component of our universe was something worth paying attention to. Or they were just news junkies. But, they were right.

Today, at CERN, and other physics laboratories around the world, we are seeking answers to the most fundamental questions of humankind: What are we made of? Where did we come from? Where are we going? What are the rules behind all this? Although we might never find the answers, the pursuit of them provides us with the knowledge and skills our children need to survive. I discuss current puzzles in particle physics and cosmology, then challenge us to keep opening our research (data, source, results) to take advantage of our culturally rich, diverse population.”

It is just 1 more days left of the Call for Papers. With the help of our great sponsors we have the opportunity to transport you to our conference if you are selected to speak. Make sure to make your submission before March 11 and you are in the race.

Posted in foss-gbg, foss-north, Miscellaneous | Comments closed

foss-north – the count down

Some people likes to talk at conferences, other dread it. At foss-north, we welcome both new and experienced speakers and work hard to make the experience pleasant to all. We are looking for contents on a wide variety of subjects. Here are some topic ideas to encourage you to submit a talk proposal:

  • Teach us your favorite tool.
  • Talk about your pet project.
  • Talk about your favourite programming language.
  • Talk about the friends you’ve made through FOSS.
  • Talk about a piece of software that you are missing.
  • Talk about how you organize your work around FOSS.
  • Talk about why FOSS helps you create your product or delivery your service.
  • Talk about software licenses.
  • Talk about software patents.
  • Talk about how you use FOSS at your school.
  • Talk about your own FOSS conference.
  • Talk about anything that you want!

Of course we want your talk to be about free and open source – that is what foss in foss-north stands for.

foss-north strives to gather the best speakers, the best audience at the best location (Gothenburg) for one day each year. This year the event takes place on April 23 – get your tickets here!

It is just 2 more days left of the Call for Papers. With the help of our great sponsors we have the opportunity to transport you to our conference if you are selected to speak. Make sure to make your submission before March 11 and you are in the race.

Posted in foss-gbg, foss-north, Miscellaneous | Comments closed

foss-north – the count down

Flashback time! At last year’s foss-north we had a great talk by Jeff Campbell from Scrum Beers and Brewing Agile. He spoke about actionable agile tools – i.e. how to improve the way your agile team works. You can see the recording right here (you might have to click the link if your aggregator hides YouTube contents).

foss-north strives to gather the best speakers, the best audience at the best location (Gothenburg) for one day each year. This year the event takes place on April 23 – get your tickets here!

It is just 3 more days left of the Call for Papers. With the help of our great sponsors we have the opportunity to transport you to our conference if you are selected to speak. Make sure to make your submission before March 11 and you are in the race.

Posted in foss-gbg, foss-north, Miscellaneous | Comments closed
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