Federated conference videos

So, foss-north 2019 happened. 260 visitors. 33 speakers. Four days of madness.

During my opening of the second day I mentioned some social media statistics. Only 7 of our speakers had mastodon accounts, but 30 had twitter accounts.

Given the current situation with an ongoing centralization of services to a few large provides, I feel that the Internet is moving in the wrong direction. The issue is that without these central repository-like services, it is hard to find contents. For instance, twitter would be boring if you had noone one to tweet to.

That is where federated services enter the picture. Here you get the best of two worlds. For instance mastodon. This is a federated micro blogging network. This means that everyone can host their own instance (or simply join one), and all instances together create the larger mastodon society. It even has the benefit of creating something of a micro-community at each server instance – so you can interact with the larger world (all federated mastodon servers), and your local community (the users of your instance).

There are multiple federated solutions out there. Everything from nextcloud, WordPress, pixelfed, matrix, to peertube. The last one, peertube, is a federated alternative to YouTube. It has similar benefits to mastodon, so you have the larger federated space, but also your local community. Discussing the foss-north videos with Reg over Mastodon, we realized that there is a gap for a peertube instance for conference videos.

Sorry for the Swedish. We basically agree that a peertube instance for conference videos is a great idea.

I really hate to say that something should happen, and not having the time to do something about it. There are so many things that really should happen. Luckily, Reg reached out to me and said – what about me setting it up.

Said and done, he went to spacebear and created an instance of peertube. Got the domain conf.tube. I started migrating videos and tested it out. You can try it yourself. For instance, here is an embedded video from the lightning talks:

If you help organizing a conference and want to use federated video hosting, contact Reg to get an account at conf.tube. If you’re interested in free and open source, drop in at conf.tube and check out the videos.

Posted in foss-north | 1 Response

foss-north 2019 – it is happening

Pinching my arm, to ensure that this is real. It feels surreal that we’ve gone from seven speakers to an amazing 33 in four years.

This years experiments are the training day, and community day. Looking at the various RSVPs for the community day, it looks like we’ll be 130+ attendees. For the conference days we have only ten tickets left out of 240, beating last years record attendance with 90 people.

The only question left is – what did I forget :-)

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foss-north 2019: Community Day


I don’t dare to count the days until foss-north 2019, but it is very soon. One of the changes to this year is that we expand the conference with an additional community day.

The idea with the community day here is that we arrange for conference rooms all across town and invite open source projects to use them for workshops, install fests, hackathons, dev sprints or whatever else they see fit. It is basically a day of mini-conferences spread out across town.

The community day is on April 7, the day before the conference days, and is free of charge.

This part of the arrangements has actually been one of the most interesting ones, as it involves a lot of coordination. I’d like to start by thanking all our room hosts. Without them, the day would not be possible!

The other half of the puzzle is our projects. I am very happy to see such a large group of projects willing to try this out for the first time, and I hope for lots and lots of visitors so that they will want to come back in the future as well.

The location of each project, as well as the contents of each room can be found on the community day page. Even though the day is free of charge, some of the rooms want you to pre-register as the seats might be limited, or they want to know if they expect five or fifty visitors. I would also love for you to register at our community day meetup, just to give me an indication of the number of participants.

Also – don’t forget to get your tickets for the conference days – and combine this with a training. We’re already past the visitor count of the 2018 event, so we will most likely be sold out this year!

Posted in Embedded, foss-gbg, foss-north, gbgcpp, KDE, KDE 4, Linux, Qt | Comments closed

foss-north 2019: Training Day

The 2019 incarnation of foss-north is less than a month away. This year we’re extending the conference in two directions: a training day and a community day. This time, I wanted to write about the training day.

The training day, April 10, is an additional day for those who want to extend
the conference with a day of dedicated training. I’m very happy to have two experienced and well known trainers on side: Michael Kerrisk and Chris Simmonds. Both has years of training experience.

Michael will teach about the details in dynamic linking. The topic may seem trivial, but when you start scratching the surface, there are a lot of details to discover such as how to handle version compatibility, how symbol resolution really works, and so on. You can read more about the Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux training here.

Chris will run a getting started with embedded Linux training. Using BeagleBone Black devices the participants will learn how to build linux for the target, how to get devices such as GPIO and i2c working and more. You can read more about the Fast Track to Embedded Linux training here.

The best part of enrolling for training at foss-north is that you also get full access to the two conference days, and that you help fund the conference itself. If you are interested, check out the tickets page.

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Last week of early birds!

This is the last week of early bird tickets for foss-north 2019. The program has not yet been set, so getting one of these tickets, you trust us to deliver a great conference – something that we’re very thankful for.

We do have some parts of the schedule fixed: the trainings and some initial speakers.

The trainings are open enrollment courses at a bargain price, where parts of the dividends goes to financing the conference. This year we have two great trainers: Michael Kerrisk of manpage and The Linux Programming Interface fame, and Chris Simmonds, the man behind the Mastering Embedded Linux Programming book and a trainer since more than 15 years. The trainings held are: Building and Using Shared Libraries on Linux and Fast Track to Embedded Linux. These are both one day courses held in a workshop format.

Browsing through the replies to the call for papers, I am convinced that the 2019 foss-north will be the best one this far – and the past three years have been great.

So, get your tickets while they are hot! ;-)

PS. If you want to help out – give me a ping at e8johan – gmail – com. We need a couple of helping hands during the event days to help make sure everything runs smoothly.


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fosdem 2019

The first weekend of February means Belgium, Brussels and fosdem. To those of you who has not been there yet, it is a huge, chaotic, crowded, but also wonderful event.

But first I was met by a huge snow storm and the following chaos. :-)

I’ve been to fosdem a number of years now, and I was brave enough to take to the stage last year. In the early days, I spent most time in various dev rooms, either hacking myself or listening to talks. For me, fosdem has changed from this to more of a social event. I’ve spent hours talking the the K-building, made sure to meet people I’ve interacted with online for the first time, and generally hang out and enjoy the company of a lot of smart people.

Another side mission of mine this year was to do some foss-north promotion. As you might know, I’m organizing the foss-north event, and I had the opportunity to meet with both speakers and sponsors during fosdem (call for papers close in ~1.5weeks, just sayin’). I also took the opportunity to hang some flyers at the venue, so hopefully some people discovered the event that way.

As I pointed out earlier, the weather was not that great, but for a few moments on Sunday morning the sun peeked out between the clouds and you could almost feel a sense of spring in the air.

I did not attend that many talks this year, but I did really appreciate Jon maddog Hall‘s talk Fifty years of Unix and Linux advances.

After the event I took the opportunity to visit Brussels with some friends. I finally got around to visit Atomium. Such an amazing place! I love the mix of the 50’s architecture and the contemporary exhibitions in some of the spheres. This place was way better than I expected it to be.

So fosdem delivered again. Chaos, so many meetings with new people as well as old friends and acquaintances, great contents, and a generally great experience in Brussels. I’m already looking forward to next year’s event!

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Get your tickets while they’re hot!

TL;DR; Get your tickets from here!

For the fourth year running, foss-north is taking place. Now bigger than ever.

It all started as a one day conference in a room with too much people in it. We gathered ten speakers and started something that continues to this day.

110 ten people in a room for 110 people.

Back then we, the three organizers: Jeremiah, Mikael and myself, joked over beers that we should have trainings, conference, community rooms and much more. A moderated FOSDEM was a crude description of what we wanted to build. But this was only us dreaming away.

During the past years we’ve tried different venues. We’ve gone from one day, one track to two days and two tracks. This year we decided to go for it all: four days, trainings, a community day and the conference.

Organizing a conference is to manage a chicken and egg type problem. You need speakers to get sponsors, and you need sponsors to get speakers to the venue. The same applies to the audience – visistors wants speakers, speakers wants visitors. This is why it takes time to establish a conference.

Last year we felt that we reached a tipping point – the call for papers was so full that we had to extend the conference with an additional day. We simply could not pick the right contents for a single day. This means that we feel that the conference part is established. If you want to speak, the call for papers is still open.

That takes us to the next steps. The community day consists of various projects and groups organizing workshops, hackathons, install fests, development sprints and whatnot throughout the city. We find venues (usually conference rooms) and projects and hope that people will come visit the various events. Again, starting from zero projects, zero venues and no real idea how many visitors to expect, we are trying to put this together. At the time of writing, it looks great. We have 7 projects and 5 venues fixed, but we are still looking for both projects and venues. If you want to join in, look at our call for projects.

The same logic applies to the training. Now we have training contents, all we need are visitors. The great thing is that our teachers, Michael Kerrisk and Chris Simmonds, are great to work with and understand our situation. Now we just have to work hard to make sure that we find students for them.

The final piece of the puzzle, which is not always visible to speakers and visitors, is the hunt for sponsors. Venues does not come for free, and we believe in compensating our speakers for their costs, thus we need sponsors. We offer the opportunity to host a booth during the conference days and the chance to meet our audience. We also believe that helping a conference focused on free and open source, is a way to contribute to the free and open source movement. For this we have a network of sponsors that we’ve worked with in the past (thank you all!) but as the conference grows, we need more help. If you want to join in, have a look at our call for sponsors

I’ve written a lot about speakers, sponsors and projects. Now all we need are visitors – lots and lots of visitors. So bring your friends to Gothenburg and join us at foss-north. The early bird tickets are available now. Get yours here!

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Speak at foss-north 2019

Would you like to speak at foss-north 2019? This is an excellent opportunity to come join a great conference on the Swedish west coast and meet the free and open source community!

The call for paper is open until late February – but it always helps if you submit your talks early. The submissions are made here. We gather a mix of different speakers – experienced speakers and first timers, technically detailed and process oriented, new contents and really old stuff. As long as it is interesting and fun, you are more than welcome. You can check-out videos and slides for past events for inspiration.

There is also an opportunity for projects who wants to do something fun to join in. Be it a development sprint, an install fest, a workshop or just a general meetup – join in and be a part of the foss-north community day. Reach out to me (e8johan, gmail) and I’ll tell you more.

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TableView and Qt 5.12 / Qt Creator 4.8

I finally got around to doing the final merge for QmlBook this year.

I just merged the chapter on the brand new TableView. This let’s you show 2D data tables in an efficient way.

I also merged the version upgrade, so the text should now reflect what is available from Qt 5.12 and be based on menus and screens from Qt Creator 4.8.

During this update of the text, we took the decision not to upgrade all import statements to QtQuick 2.12. Instead, we use different versions in different places. However, the contents of Qt 5.12 is covered.

There are still two things left for the 5.12 branch. The first is to use the new input handlers, e.g. TapHandler instead of MouseArea. The second is to setup a release branch in the CI system so that there is a 5.12 version of the book built separately. I suspect that this will force me to learn more Travis tricks :-)

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Merging QmlBook Contents

What better way to spend a lazy Christmas day than to merge some of the new chapters to the QmlBook?

Since having updated the CI system, there is a bit of manual merging forth and back to get each new piece of contents on-line. Specifically, rebase my fork’s master to upstream/master, then rebase my working branch on my master, and then pushing.

One of the newly added chapters cover Qt Quick Controls 2, which is the recommended way to create controls such as buttons, sliders, checkboxes, menues, and so on. Here we look at how you target various form factors such as desktop and mobile, but also how to maintain a common code base between the two.

The other new chapter has a look at Qt for Python from a QML perspective. This chapter goes from the very basic all the way to exposing a Qt model representing the data of an existing Python module to QML.

Posted in KDE, Qt | Comments closed
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